The High Line Blog

  • Plant of the Week: Sea Lavender

    Limonium platyphyllum, or sea lavender, is a clump-forming perennial native to southeastern and central Europe. It blooms July through August and reveals hundreds of tiny, lavender-blue flowers at the ends of thin, wire-like stems. Despite its common name, it is not related to lavenders at all... read more
  • Open Encounter: A Conversation with Brendan Fernandes

    In anticipation of Brendan Fernandes' Out of Line performance on August 16, we invited Ted Kerr, a Brooklyn-based writer, organizer and teacher at the New School, to sit down and chat with Brendan about his art, life, and inspiration for Open Encounter. Theodore (Ted) Kerr: How do you defi... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Virginia marsh-St. John's-wort

    Triadenum virginicum, also referred to as Hypericum virginicum and by its common name Virginia marsh-St. John's-wort is a perennial plant. This marsh herb belongs to the Clusiaceae family. Marsh St. John's wort is most prevalent in New England. However, its native range extends down the easter... read more
  • Shasta Geaux Pop: A Conversation with Ayesha Jordan and Charlotte Brathwaite

    In anticipation of Ayesha Jordan and Charlotte Brathwaite's Out of Line performance on July 19, we invited Ted Kerr, a Brooklyn based writer, organizer and teacher at the New School, to sit down and chat with the duo about their work, how they met, and the evolution of Shasta. Theordore (T... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Star of Persia

    Did the presence of a cluster of purple stars bewitch you along your High Line commute? Allium cristophii, also known as the star of Persia, shows bright vibrant shades of purple from late spring to early summer. Although Allium cristophii attracts most of its attention while in bloom, it i... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Yellow pitcher plant

    Sarracenia flava, also known as yellow pitcher plant, is a perennial native to southeastern United States. In the wild, its range stretches from Virginia to Florida, sweeping west to Mobile Bay, Alabama. It can grow from one and a half feet to three feet tall and can spread from one and a half... read more
  • Behind the Bushes: The Gay History of the High Line

    In a lovely elegy for the "queer building" of 2 Columbus Circle, former New York Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp wrote about the role gay audiences play in historic preservation and reuse, and in the collective memory of a city: The gay audience, excluded by society, has an o... read more
  • No More Shimmering Cowboys: A Conversation with Yara Travieso

    In anticipation of Yara Travieso's Out of Line performance on June 21, we invited Ted Kerr, a Brooklyn based writer, organizer and teacher at the New School, to sit down and chat with Yara about her art, life, and the inspiration behind No More Shimmering Cowboys. Theodore (Ted) Kerr: What... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Sweetclover

    Sweetclover, Melilotus officinalis, can be found growing on the Interim Walkway by the Western Rail Yards. It is an annual, sometimes biennial, ranging in height between two feet in poor, dry soils to eight feet tall in richer, moist soils. The leaves are in alternate arrangement on the st... read more
  • Plant of the Week: Northern maidenhair fern

    Adiantum pedatum, also called northern maidenhair fern, is one of my favorite plants that you can find here on the High Line. It is a deciduous perennial plant, and like many ferns, it is in the Pteridaceae family. This fern can grow to 2.5 feet tall and 1.5 feet wide. In the wild, they are na... read more